Intravenous Therapy

  1. Immune Boost; There are many oral supplements that are available to stimulate a mild immune response. At Advanced Medical Therapeutics, our intravenous immune cocktail allows for increased bioavailability of immune stimulating nutrients.
    Immune Cocktail Ingredients:
    1. Glycyrrhizic acid
    2. Zinc
    3. Vitamin C
    4. B complex
    5. Calcium
    6. Magnesium
    7. Glutathione
    8. Taurine
  2. Weight Loss; MIC (methionine, inositol, choline) injections are used for their lipotropic (fat burning) effect. Lipotropic nutrients promote the export of fat from the liver and are necessary for maintenance of a healthy liver, and for burning the exported fat for additional energy.
  3. Myer's Cocktail; The modified "Myers' cocktail," which consists of magnesium, calcium, B vitamins, and vitamin C, has been found to be effective against acute asthma attacks, migraines, fatigue (including chronic fatigue syndrome), fibromyalgia, acute muscle spasm, upper respiratory tract infections, chronic sinusitis, seasonal allergic rhinitis, cardiovascular disease, and other disorders; (Altern Med Rev 2002;7(5):389-403).
  4. High Dose Intravenous Vitamin C; numerous peer-review journal articles have been written on the use of high dose vitamin C for multiple diseases, including viral illness and cancer. Although vitamin C is generally considered an antioxidant, when used in high doses intravenously, Vit C functions as a pro-oxidant.
  5. Intravenous NAD; NAD is essential for optimal mitochondrial function, which is essential for the generation of ATP (energy). As we age, NAD levels fall, and the NAD/NADH ratio (the level of oxidized to reduced form of NAD) decreases. A few alcohol and drug rehabilitation centers are now using IV NAD as a treatment for addiction. Paul O'Holleran (1961) published to an unreceptive medical audience his results of a study supported by Abbot Laboratories at the Shadel Hospital Research Department, in Seattle, Washington. He reported that he was able to treat both alcohol addiction and all types of drug addiction with NAD, a coenzyme which the body makes out of the vitamin nicotinic acid (niacin). His study was on 100 patients addicted to heroin, pantopone, morphine, dihydro-morphine, meperidine, codeine, cocaine, amphetamines, barbiturates, and tranqulizers. He used NAD, intramuscularly or intravenously in a slow drip in quantities of up to 1000 mg per day for a period of four days. He stated that the addict experienced no symptoms of withdrawal on this treatment and had no desire for addicting substances following treatment while in the hospital; Cleary, JP; The NAD Deficiency Diseases; J Orthomol Med, 1986
  6. Intravenous Curcumin; promising effects have been observed in patients with various pro-inflammatory diseases including chronic pain, cancer, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel disease, peptic ulcer, gastric ulcer, gastric inflammation, vitiligo, psoriasis, acute coronary syndrome, atherosclerosis, diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic microangiopathy, lupus nephritis, renal conditions, cholecystitis, and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Curcumin has also shown protection against hepatic conditions, chronic arsenic exposure, and alcohol intoxication; Subash C. Gupta, Sridevi Patchva, and Bharat B. Aggarwal; Therapeutic Roles of Curcumin: Lessons Learned from Clinical Trials; AAPS J. 2013 Jan; 15(1): 195-218
  7. Glutathione Injections;
    1. Multiple Sclerosis; Oxidative stress has been strongly implicated in both the inflammatory and neurodegenerative pathological mechanisms in multiple sclerosis (MS). Glutathione (GSH) is the major antioxidant in the brain, and as such plays a pivotal role in the detoxification of reactive oxidants. Previous research has shown that GSH homeostasis is altered in MS; Carvalho, Andreia; Glutathione in multiple sclerosis: More than just an antioxidant?; Multiple Sclerosis Journal; May 19, 2014
    2. Parkinson's Disease; Several studies have demonstrated a deficiency in reduced glutathione (GSH) in the nigra of patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD). In particular, the magnitude of reduction in GSH seems to parallel the severity of the disease. This finding may indicate a means by which the nigra cells could be therapeutically supported. The authors studied the effects of GSH in nine patients with early, untreated PD. GSH was administered intravenous, 600 mg twice daily, for 30 days, in an open label fashion. All patients improved significantly after GSH therapy, with a 42% decline in disability. Once GSH was stopped the therapeutic effect lasted for 2-4 months. Our data indicate that in untreated PD patients GSH has symptomatic efficacy and possibly retards the progression of the disease; Sechi, G.; Reduced intravenous glutathione in the treatment of early Parkinson's disease; Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 1996 Oct;20(7):1159-70.